Trails to the Farm, Part 2

The house that Pa built

Charles arrived in Hodgeman County in 1877 full of hope and expectations!  Sure there were still Indians roaming that neck of Plains, but they were proving to be friendly, for the moment.  And yes, there were many unknowns: the weather, the economy, the sociological issues, the establishment of local government, the insects.  It was probably a good thing he didn’t know about all of that, but he was eager to make his own way; to prove himself.  He had mountains to prove as he was labeled “illegitimate” back in his home country of Germany.  Or that’s the story we’re told although his daughters or granddaughters would not talk about it.  Ever.

Once Charles was established, he began building a home…the first frame house in the county.  Probably the limestone barn was built first, but the house came second.  It still stands as testimony to his skill and determination!  And he helped build many buildings and a mill in the town east of him, where he walked daily the eleven miles to reach his work sites.  Can you imagine?  There are no records of exactly how long he was on the farm by himself, but we do know that he sent for his family in 1878. 

The family consisting of Clementine and the four children, boarded from the platform on a train that was going to take them more than 1300 miles away from family they would never see again. Ever.

(Somehow I’ll post.  It may be short since my SmartPhone will probably be the only way I can post.  And the SmartPhone tends to one-up me easily, so I’m not making any promises. And remember, I’m new at this. Still learning what all the bells and whistles do!)

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5 Responses to Trails to the Farm, Part 2

  1. phylly3 says:

    I am enjoying your family history and I am impressed you can post from your phone too! 🙂

    Like

  2. The Queen says:

    I’m amazed too! But when typos have to be corrected you do what you have to do!!!! Thanks phylly3 for reading!

    Like

  3. servetus says:

    It’s not nosiness (said the historian), it’s detail orientation. Your posterity will be grateful.

    Like

  4. The Queen says:

    Big Boss thinks the genealogy thing is an obsession/disease. Of course when you take tours of cemeteries, you know you’re a goner.

    Like

  5. phylly3 says:

    I like cemetaries (even when there is no one I know in them). I find them peaceful places – of course not after dark!

    Like

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