Mini Jacks for your window box!

imageSince I could find NOTHING to do today, I got my Wee Jack O’Lanterns carved, sanitized, positioned and lit.  In a window box.  Actually, I have 2 but this one is protected from the wind.  That means the other one may get Jack O’Lanterns but of the Hobby Lobby sort, as in plastic.  We’ll see. This idea would work great in large potted plants also!

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I stuck a leftover Jack in the Ornamental Kale and scooted it up against some mums.

I found this cute idea years ago in a Southern Living magazine, my most favorite mag in the world!!!  It was the October 2005 issue.  It looked like this…

Photo courtesy of Southern Living, October 2005, Ralph Anderson.

Photo courtesy of Southern Living, October 2005, Ralph Anderson.

That first year, I used the teensy pumpkins that you can find in bags at the grocery store nowadays.

But they were hard to carve…literally HARD. And so, this year, I looked for pumpkins closer to the size SL recommended…baseball size.

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This is my favorite little Jack!

It took a bit of searching through the bins but deep in the “pie pumpkins”, I found what I needed.  Truthfully, they were a tad larger than a baseball, but close enough!

I carved some of the features and some I hammered fondant cutters through the pumpkins for the nice, round eyes and noses.  I scraped the insides out really clean, which also lightens these thick-fleshed pumpkins up.

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Leftover Jacks being displayed.

Then, I used Lysol with Bleach to spray the inside and outsides of each pumpkin and the lid…according to experts, this step helps prolong the life of the Jack O’Lantern and we ALL want to do our part in keeping our pumpkins ALIVE and WELL as long as possible!!!

After they air-dried on top of the picnic table, I mounted them on jar lids that are mounted on wooden dowels.  Now this step is tricky.  The article says to drive a nail through the lid  (the nail will be pushed into Jack as the last step), then flip it upside down and hammer another nail into the dowel. Sounds easy huh?  NOT!!@#$!!   Then you spray paint the lid and dowel black…but green would work too.

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I ended up hot-gluing it all together. I couldn’t find the 1″ dowels and settled for a smaller size.  That was a mistake! Also, I think the nails that you use to go into the Jack should be longer…maybe 1″?  I’ll let you know how the hot glue method works out after a week or so…

Sometimes I use battery LED tea-lights if it’s windy, otherwise, I put tea candles in, light them and enjoy.

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The green plants that have been showing off yellow blooms all summer have closed up shop due to the cold temps. I should know the name of the plants but my mind is drawing a complete blank.  Arghh.  Anyway, the touches of yellow, white and rust mums add a little color. I’ve also used English Ivy with the Jacks.

While I love huge, big, fat Jack O’Lanterns, these teensy mini Jacks just tickle me!!  A lot!  🙂

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3 Responses to Mini Jacks for your window box!

  1. Fancy Nancy says:

    Really cute! I must try this when I retire (no time til then…we stopped carving any gourds several years ago! 😦 Might I give a possible suggestion of the dowel attachment solution….if I understand the instructions correctly? Several years ago, I saw a tip on cutting the whole in the BOTTOM of the pumpkin to scoop out the innards. It makes for a pretty uncut stem top. Would this simply the nailing process of attaching the minis to the dowel? You could easily nail the bottom piece to the dowel. Then you just light (turn on) the candle and fit the pumpkin back over the cut bottom. The thickness of the pumpkin should hold it in place. Would this work? Might be worth a try!

    Like

    • Fancy Nancy says:

      Forgot to mention…and this may be common knowledge…when cutting the initial hole (and YES I misspelled this in my previous post :/ ) angle the cut instead of a straight cut , to have a snugger fit of lid and gourd.

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      • The Queen says:

        I’ll try this method. Where I had the most trouble was hammering the nail into the dowel..obviously my carpentry skills are somewhat “disabled”!!!! And the angled lid cut is important! I should have mentioned that. THanks!!

        Like

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